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DPAC – 73 Disabled People Die Each Week due to Welfare Cuts

DPAC LogoThe lack of access afforded to Deaf people is shocking. We know that it has got worse since 2009 since outsourcing started in the north west and spread across the UK.
Since the Tories came to power in 2010 (sorry, the Coalition)… welfare cuts have been wide sweeping and have affected the most vulnerable: the bedroom tax, changes to delivery of benefits including PIP, cuts of 50% to local government funding leaving social services crippled, a cash-starved NHS and sanctions which force disabled people (who should not be working) into working for corporate companies whilst on benefits.
What is the actual effect of these changes? 73 disabled people die per week. 73.
All whilst the Tories gave the richest 1% in the country an effective pay rise by slashing the top rate of tax from 50% to 45%.
What is the spin we see in the media? Disabled people are scroungers, tax cuts bring billions into the country. We rarely hear about any of the 73 who die due to these changes. Why aren’t they reported?
And where are Deaf people in all this? They are just the next small group to be targeted by government. A group whose voice is less likely to be heard amongst all the rhetoric. There’s a general election coming whilst people are dying or feeding themselves with visits to a food bank. This does not mean that Deaf people and interpreters should count themselves lucky. It means that we should fight for our jobs, fight for Deaf people to get equal levels of access and we should join in with campaigns. It’s time to start shouting louder and make our voices heard.
Follow Disabled People Against the Cuts (DPAC) for updates on the effects of the cuts and their campaigns against the changes.

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  1. The Government do seem to be making it harder and harder for Deaf people to access various services including Access 2 Work, unfortunately Disabled people do not complain.
    I currently arrange all of the Sign Language for a Local Authority and provide all of its information in accessible formats (Braille, Large Print ETC) and have been told that the service I run is to cease in October, making it harder for Disabled people living in this Local Authorities catchment area to access information they have a right to receive.
    Local and Government Authorities seem to see services provided to, for and on behalf of Disabled people as expendable, able to get rid of them to save money, which is wrong.
    How far will these cuts go without the Disabled population of this Country realising they are getting the short straw.
    In my personal opinion we are returning to Victorian values where Disabled people were segregated, not able to participate in Society because it was not accessible to them.
    My personal fear with regard to Access 2 Work is, i hope ALS do not become the preferred supplier for A2W.
    these are my own personal opinions and in no way are intended to imply any negativity towards any individual, organisation or group.